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themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
u.s. banks offline one day, one bank after another. if the united states and israel bomb iran next year to stop the nuclear program i think we can say with high confidence that iran will retaliate. since israel or united states have attacked their homeland iran will attack in our homeland. not with terrorism but with cyber war, knocking out banking prehaps, electricity, causing havoc and getting away with it because we cannot defend successfully today against that kind of attack. [applause] >> that's a sobering thought to start a conversation with. as it happened, there were two pages in this week's "economists" that you should have on this subject on cyber war and i think it is helpful, if you can walk us through what exactly is meant by cyber war. you, yourself, mention cyber crime, cyber espionage there is a blurring of the lines. what do you mean by cyber war? >> you can rebbe using the word chuw. criber crime which is successful -- cyber crime which is successful. the cyber espionage which i think is the most serious thing today, that is the theft not 06 money but information,
tunes. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is "gps global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you today from london. happy new year. on today's show, we'll look ahead at what 2013 might bring around the world. i have a great panel richard haass, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
the united arabs pledged money. >> there's no milita solution. this should be resolved through political solution. french troops are gaining ground in mali. they have taken control of the airport near algeria. french troops launched an operation three weeks ago. mali is a former frempnch colon. arabs have been kidnapped suspected of having links to the rebels and they have ramsacked shops. they sent a threat in nigeria. >>> three chinese naval vsels have left for exeises i the western pacific ocean be comments fueled concerns among china ea china's neighbors over how the military will deal with the number of territory disputes. >>> people living in china know the air they have been breathing is bad. they've created a higher smog alert to track air pollution. the aunt of high particulate air has been high. an increasing number of chinese are suffering from respiratory problems. they decided to add a third level to their two-level smog alert. the highest warning now advises people to stay indoors. >> translator: i can't stand it anymore. i want to leave this place. >> translator: it's the
to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, imperfect union: the eurozone in crisis. (instrumental
as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both liberal and democratic or constitutional republic and. you can use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. z√úrich government based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution, hence the compound machine. one of the major charges raised against king george the third in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i've read that church. he, george the third has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowl
on the united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution to the jurisprudence is his renowned commentary on the constitution. eminently quoted joseph story famously incorrectly declared, quote, a constitution of government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation and of quote. this lecture series celebrates the legacy into law. prior to the joseph story lectures have been and judge robert bork, professor john harrison at the university school of law, judge raymond randolph of the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit, and last year chief justice of the united states court of appeals for the sixth circuit. tonight we are honored to have a fifth name to the prestigious list as we welcome justice anthony kennedy who will deliver this evening's joseph story distinguished lecture on the topic, t
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000 graduates this year. what are the others going to do? there are jobs available and good jobs available, but we have to first let them know what to expect upon graduation. second thing we have to do is make sure we continue to have the profession look like our society. two spots of the examples. hispanic lawyers, less than 4%. 15% of our society. african americans come 8% come away under-represented. what we are doing in that regard as we have minority scholarships and a program where we put minority students with federal judges and state judges. we have a diversity center, which are the only four missions of the
his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. and we'll be sharing what that means through a new campaign we are launching over the next few weeks, which will focus on raising understanding of the unique and foundational role of the u.s. oil and natural gas industry and what it means to our economy. what it means for our communities, and for o- america's lives, for revenue, for refining, and what it means ultimately to job creation and economic recovery. oil and natural gas companies support 9.2 million jobs and could easily support an additional 1.4 million
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
washington. your gracious favor and devine blessings upon these united states of america, our president, barack obama, and vice president joseph biden as a second term of their sacred responsibilities in the highest office of our country. bless, preserve, and keep them and their families safe and healthy together with all who serve our nation's, especially in the congress, the judiciary, and the armed forces, here and everywhere who heroically and sack -- sacrifice for the life of liberty and the pursuit of happiness. father, may we ever abide in this land of opportunity and freedom in perfect tranquility, faithful to our foundations and ever more prosperous, just e quitble society for all our citizens, and may we always share our faith and hope for the future with the whole world through your define and gracious love. amen. >> thank you. >> okay, please be seated for a moment. my pleasure, arch bishop. thank you. well, i think everyone would agree there's been a wonderful inaugust grail ceremony, a delicious lunch, and it's now time to head to the next happy stop, the presidential para
that opened up hope for six and a half million people. the problem is the united states has never been very good, whether it's in afghanistan, iraq, in creating an alternative and the bol line is the united states basically walked away when it came to how do you create a new state, how do you facilitate the diverse forces, whether it's the tribal elements, more than 300 militias that had formed during that brief eight-month involvement, how do you stem the flow of weaponry and create an alternative. if you saw charlie wilson's war, at the very ending of the movie when he says i raised all this money, billions of dollars for arms to the opposition to fight off the soviets but i couldn't raise a couple of million dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tun
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arri
responds likewise. delegates at the united nations have agreed to expand sanctions on north korea. the security council condemned a rocket launch there last month. chinese delegates have long provided diplomatic protection for their north korean allies. but they approved the resolution and members adopted it unanimously. the statement criticizes the launch as a violation of previous resolutions. the security council will add organizations and individuals to lists of existing sanctions and freeze their assets. the north korean space agency is among those named. >> today's resolution also makes clear that if north korea chooses again to defy the international community such as by conducting another launch or a nuclear test then the council will take significant action. >> american delegates told the chinese the resolution would not bring in new measures but would build existing sanctions. those assurances convinced the chinese to approve the resolution. >> and we believe that there's opportunity for all stakeholders of the peninsula, korean peninsula, to start a diplomatic track an
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
the united states has had drones over that plant for much of the time. so at this hour this is what we do know, that the algerian government has concluded its operations against the terrorists that the incident is ending. some north african news outlets have claimed that at least 35 captives were killed in the algerian military rescue attacks the "wall street journal" is reporting algerian government sources putting the number of casualties to be ten or perhaps 11. this is what reuters news service is reporting. thirty hostages killed when the algerian forces stormed the plant. two of them japanese, to -- a french national. the nationalities of the rest as well as those who escaped remain unclear at this hour, and those rescued. fox news, however, confirms that at least two americans are among those who escaped and are on their way out of algeria heading to london. still, as many as seven americans are reportedly missing at this hour, as i said, all of this is very fluid, and many of these numbers are going to change as we learn more, hopefully far more during the course of this hour. mea
. [inaudible] there is a lot of sacred stuff going around in the republican party. they need to be more united and they are not. the american people elected the same people over and over and over. until that stops i don't know how americans are going to move forward. another comment i wanted to make too is that, talking about the left-wing media, that is correct. there is the hannity show -- it doesn't help. >> host: robert costa his comment that there is back and forth behind the scenes that we don't know but? >> guest: the 2012 election house republicans lost a lot of seats but there was no rebellion within the caucus in the internal leadership to break with cantor, boehner or mccarthy, the top three. the only real race he saw was for conference chairman cathy mcmorris-rodgers represented from washington who ran against tom price a representative from georgia for the number four spot. cathy mcmorris-rodgers beat out prices of former chairman of the republican study committee a conservative group in the house so you saw that level the fourth ranking level some fighting. boehner kantian mccart
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
problem. >> also in the uk we have that. liz: britain is not the size of the united states. we have different issues. >> yes but we have to much austerity you do not want to go our direction. liz: you have been terrific. have a terrific weekend. thank you for watching. lou: good evening, everybody. a federal appellate court ruling that president obama violated the constitution more than a year ago when he made three recess appointments to the national labor relations board. this week began with the administration's all-out assault on the second amendment and our right to own guns and concludes with this federal court ruling that the administration acted against the constitution and in so doing the court, through the nlrb rulings of the past 16 months into question. this week the republican party put forward a plan on the debt ceiling in debt and appears to have won the support of both the president and senate majority leader. the republican change in direction and tone was not matched by a change in the republican party's lead. the rnc reelected the chairman after losing both the wh
alongside men on the front liance. some opponents say this could lead to problems with unit cohesion and combat readiness. >> my issue here is, mixing the genderses in infantry units and armored units and special forces units is not a positive. there are many distracters which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> reporter: others claim women suffer more combat casualties than illnesses and pregnancy is an issue. to senator john mccain, it's equal standards for certain demanding jobs. >> i think women are obviously -- are prepared to serve side by side with men in combat. i just want to emphasize, though, there should be the same physical and mental standards for anyone to perform certain roles and functions in the military. >> reporter: many say it's a question of equal rights and serving in combat allows a soldier to advance through the ranks, farther and faster. >> the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to
to the president of the united states asking them to do. and the letter is in i think a copy of letter isn't maxing. also online. but what is so striking for me about that is if you stop for a moment and imagine that instant in time july 1903 where your brother has been kidnapped, and kidnapped a year ago and is in slavery, she's probably visited him. i think the letter signals that so she has seen in chains being worked with dozens of other men out on a farm, on a 20,000-acre plantation in south georgia owned by the most powerful white family in georgia at the time. she knows the desperate state he is in pictures of witness the deprivations being perpetrated against in -- against them. no one of power in her world cares come and to reach a moment of human desperation so great that the only thing you can think of to do still, the only thing left to try is write a letter to the president of the united states, at the magic that that might actually a college some good. the depth of desperation of that moment was so powerful to me when i first found out later. and, of course, what happened, nothing. no
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
is to unite the state of israel. >> says he will promote jewish values as well as easing the economic strain on families. another man of the moment is the former tv personality and is vying for enough votes for a possible coalition party. they are making the economy their main issue. shimon peres will decide whether to give binyamin netanyahu the first chance of forming a coalition. that is a process that took five weeks after the last election. let's talk about the situation after the election. it sounds like putting together a coalition will be tricky. >> it appears so. the last government all molested two years. then the labor party pulled out . in this case it might be even more complicated. binyamin netanyahu, if he is given the first nod, will have 28 days to form a coalition. then he has another 12 days. the question is whether some other party will be asked to put together a coalition. any kind of coalition would veer to the right. if he could do that with a minimum of cooperation would be his preference. >> thank you for reporting to us live from jerusalem. you can see our front pag
conflicts in the north. i'm not sure the united states has [indiscernible] >> thank you. great question. first and foremost, we recognize that it is not only the u.s., it is not our responsibility do just that, not the primary people. that must reside with the nigerian government. it we tried to take the lead, we would not get it right. we do not understand the context. we are americans and not nigerians. it would be difficult for us to be effective. our focus has been working through our u.s. ambassador with the nigerians to say, what can we do to help you? we think that is the right approach. we have an ongoing dialogue with the nigerian officials on what types of support might be helpful. for my comment about mali, there are numerous nigerian officers and noncommissioned officers who trained with us for a year in the united states and other programs across europe. we think that is a good endeavor. we are talking with the nigerians. they made some specific request to help them. some of the lessons that we have learned in iraq and afghanistan in countering improvised explosive devices,
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
or the united states or anyone should have called what happened -- [inaudible] but the fact that no one actually dared any questions about the levels of polarization in venezuela, what this meant for respect for the letter, if not certainly the spirit of the constitution, on what this meant for the potential for conflict, um, was i think very sad. and worse, this is a government that is very good -- [audio difficulty] but in terms of consistently named the supreme court violating its own procedures, and it consistently now, and, you know, if it comes to an election, let me venture a guess the constitution requires the election be held within 30 days. if they were wise, they could hold it within five, still within the letter of the constitution, keep the opposition on their heels. i think what's sad is what happened on the decision of the supreme court december 9th and 10th is that there were over four million people whose voices were not heard. we're not talking about, you know, the people that were sworn in only represented roughly about 55% of the people. if chavez is the people, he's only 55%
of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the 1970's. so we had one to carry the injection and the other to carry the big spacecraft until somebody said we met. if we look at what we want to do, which is to get a man on the moon and bring him back, let's look at the settlements of this instead of a spacecraft to do everything. >> 100 years from now -- i'm just throwing a question and i will go back to this -- that you touched on something hundred, 200 years from now or we going to look back at the space program and say how primitive. in the 200 years, where to go from here from new york come to london, how advanced is this thing going to get? >> time will tell o
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
not be so in the united states military? >> no, i cannot think of any reason. and i have heard the naysayers. i no there are many out there that believe this cannot be done without compromising those standards . having served almost 38 years in an institution where i have lived and scene change throughout my career, and i can assure you, being one of the very first female officers had the opportunity to attend airborne school, and you can imagine the looks on the instructors. it was not a popular decision. but, can assure you that having that opportunity to go to airborne school. people say why you want to jump out of a perfectly good airplane? well, it was exciting. it sounded challenging. so i had the opportunity to do that, but by having that opportunity that later opened the door for me to serve in the esteemed 802nd airborne division and command there. i had the opportunity to go to jet master's cool. that is a very prestigious and demanding school. primarily male dominated. i was the only female in the class surrounded by special forces folks. you know, they didn't change the standards
the people of the united states in order to form a more perfect union -- >> no person except a natural-born citizen shall be eligible to the office of president. >>> the powers to all cases of law and equity. >> full faith and credit given in each state to the public acts. >> congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. >> neither slavery nor involuntary servitude shall exist within the united states. >> the validity of the public debt of the united states authorized by law shall not be questioned. >> the right of citizens of the united states to vote shall not be denied on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude. >> the right of the citizens of the united states to vote shall not be denied on account of sex. >> the 18th article of the amendment to the constitution of the amendment is hereby repealed. >> ah, the constitution from those opening lines we the people to the 21st amendment, wahoo! glorious document. i think i heard a clap or two in there about the debt and the nati
premiums not keeping pace with high medical costs this year that hit shares of united health care. the stock fell 4.7% as volume almost tripled. this is its lowest price since mid-november. investment bank deutsche bank downgraded its rating of the managed health insurance sector, including united health care to neutral. the analyst pointed to more competition for customers holding down premium price increases. retail stocks were in focus with many of them reporting december sales. we'll have more on that in a moment, but two very different retailers had very different updates on their financial outlooks. deep discount store family dollar cut its outlook after a disappointing quarterly profit. shares fell 13%, dropping to a 10 month low. teen apparel store hot topic jumped 11.1% to a new 52 week high. hott topic predicted its earnings growth this year to be twice what wall street analysts had expected. just what spiced ham needs, peanut butter. spam maker hormel foods is buying the skippy peanut butter business from unilever. hormel is paying $700 million for skippy. the deal cont
fire damage to the battery of the auxiliary power unit. remember, the auxiliary power unit is what is used to provide power to an airplane when it is parked on the tarmac, not while it's in flight so the battery unit, severe fire kagge there, and it's pretty clear, scott and maria, that we are going to see more airlines, if they haven't already, they are going to start checking their wiring on the battery unit. i just spoke with the folks out of ana in japan. they have a number of dreamliners, checked theirs overnight at the urging of the ministry of transportation in j.i just talked with united airlines. it has checked the battery power wiring on all of its dreamliners, all six of them. the "wall street journal" reports that one of them did not have the wiring done properly, so that's clearly where the investigation is headed regarding those dreamliners and the fire we saw yesterday in boston. back to you. >> thanks. certainly will continue watching that story. boeing a dreadful couple of days as a result of this and traded already more than two times its average daily volume as a
hands. when it comes to america's role in world affairs, i know we agree it is critical the united states remain fully engaged. we project the power of our military strength when necessary and the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and demands we will face. there is no doubt he will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done in the senate and the chairmanship of this committee is an anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and godspeed in many journeys that lie ahead. we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me recognize senator corker. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me thank are three distinguished guests. i want to thank you for your courtesy over the last six years as i served on this committee. i looked at you and been nominated for this as someone who has lived their entire life for this moment of being able to
to help create innovation focused jobs again in the united states. as you know all too well, madam president, our economic recovery has been slower than we would hope, although it's been steady, there are still far too many americans out of work. in my home state of delaware, more than 30,000. but we are building our way ba back. so the task before us is to think not just about an immediate economic crisis but to take a breath i think and instead focus strategically on the long-term fewer, to take -- long-term future, to take an account of what kind of economy we want to build for our children, for our grandchildren, for the america of today and tomorrow. the engine of our nation's greatest economic successes has always been innovation. from the light bulb to the search engine, american inventors and innovators, those who've taken risks and started companies, have created jobs by the thousands and changed lives by the millions. but before new ideas can scale to market and reach out to change the world, they first have to start in a lab or garage. i know from my own eight years in t
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